What happens to the body after quitting smoking for 30 minutes, 8 hours, 2 days and 1 year

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According to the UK Office for National Statistics, about one in seven people in the UK smoke. The number rises to one in five between the ages of 25 and 34. The positive signal is that more than half want to quit smoking.

What happens to the body after quitting smoking for 30 minutes, 8 hours, 2 days and 1 year?

This desire is difficult to fulfill for many people but brings quick benefits after a short period of time.

20-30 minutes

Twenty minutes to half an hour after making the determination to turn away from cigarettes, your blood pressure and pulse should drop. Hands and feet will start to warm up as circulation improves.

8 o’clock

Eight hours after quitting, you will feel uncomfortable, comfort yourself that your lungs have already begun to rid themselves of the toxic substances remaining after smoking.

CO is removed from the body, thus allowing the lungs to remove mucus as oxygen levels rise.

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48 hours

Two days later, ex-smokers will have an improvement in their sense of smell and taste.

72 hours

After 3 days, the benefits and harms of quitting are more pronounced. The bronchi in the lungs begin to dilate, making breathing easier.

2-3 months

If you can last 2 months without smoking, your circulatory and lung function will improve, your tolerance will also be enhanced. The lungs will be cleaner due to the ability to remove excess mucus.

1-9 months

Coughs caused by smoking and sinus congestion will ease. The lungs will continue to improve in function, clearing mucus more effectively, thereby reducing the risk of infection.

In general, a person who quits will notice an improvement in their energy levels.

one year

Twelve months after giving up nicotine, the risk of heart disease drops to half that of a smoker.

5 years

Your risk of having a stroke will be about the same as that of a non-smoker.

The risk of cancer of the mouth, throat and esophagus is halved and the risk of cervical cancer is reduced.

10 years

The risk of lung cancer is reduced to half that of a smoker. The risk of pancreatic cancer is about the same as that of the general population.

15 years

The risk of heart disease is similar to that of a non-smoker. Notably, the risk of premature death was roughly the same as for other people.